The Crescent and Cheese

where east meets the midwest

Posts Tagged ‘jan cavanaugh

My Letter to NBC Regarding Mike Florio

with 2 comments

To whom it may concern,

I remember the fall of 1998 with eerie clarity. I remember sitting by the bedside of my dying grandmother and reciting chapters of healing from the Qur’an. I remember staying up all night reciting, praying, and reciting again. The vibrant and dynamic woman who helped raise me lay unconscious on a hospital bed for days with an IV and a host of technology keeping her alive. My grandmother died from breast cancer that October. There are still chapters in the Qur’an I have difficulty reading without re-living that experience.

Imagine my horror, my dismay, my anguish when a man I respected for all his grace, philanthropy, and charity was exposed for having little real care for his fans in need. When Mr. Florio posted his piece on Aaron Rodgers on ProFootball.com, I was completely dismayed. The perception, the respect, I had for my team’s quarterback wavered. I thought back to all the stories of his charitable work, of his support for the MACC fund, of his support of the Boys and Girls Club, to the stories one hears from Green Bay and Wisconsin natives of his behind the scenes philanthropy. Could all that have been a lie? Could all this be another Brett Favre: a cold, calculating person manipulating his image into something he is in fact quite different from? Worst of all, could he be so cold to someone much like my grandmother?

When I saw Mrs. Cavanaugh’s face as she turned away from Rodgers, my heart broke. I remembered that my grandmother, especially after my grandfather’s death, felt like she had nothing to live for. I remember her telling my mother in a soft, anguish filled voice, “let me die. It’s enough.” After reading that article, after seeing Mr. Florio’s perspective, I saw all that in Mrs. Cavanaugh’s face, a woman for whom the Packers are obviously intertwined with the very word life. Could Aaron Rodgers have been so cold, so heartless to a woman who so easily could have been my grandmother? My entire respect and admiration for him as a person was close to shattering.

Until, of course, Mr. Florio’s article was exposed for what it really was: a well orchestrated character assassination not even a day after the best performance of his career. Mrs. Cavanaugh’s face wasn’t that of anguish and hurt for being rejected and humiliated: it was that of disappointment that Aaron Rodgers didn’t sign her hat after he had signed other things for her the week prior and years before. Aaron Rodgers did not, in fact, “refuse to acknowledge her existence” and treat her as an unimportant non-entity as Mr. Florio suggested. It was something he needed to do to maintain his concentration for an upcoming game. He did not treat her pain and the pain of all those like her and surrounding her unimportantly. My pain, and the pain of all those who survive cancer victims, was not disrespected by Aaron Rodgers. It was disrespected by Mr. Florio.

Mr. Florio played with my emotions–played with the emotions of all survivors, their families, and the families of those who didn’t survive. Mr. Florio is either guilty of a sloppy character assassination attempt or criminal incompetence in journalism. How dare he-how dare he- use such painful memories to advance his goal–that of either destroying Aaron Rodgers’ image or to gain publicity for his trashy celebrity athlete gossip site. As a credible news organization, as a respectable source of news with standards of journalism, it is your duty to discipline such action and to make it clear that playing with such terrible emotions for personal gains will not be tolerated. It is deplorable, despicable journalism at its very best, and you, as his sponsors, have the responsibility to make a clear statement against it.

Sincerely,

Muhammad Saad Yacoob

Written by AdmiralPrice

January 17, 2011 at 8:31 pm